Subscribe to blog: RSS Feed

Obtain Better Results from Direct Reports: Initiative

Home
Blog
Obtain Better Results from Direct Reports: Initiative

Obtain Better Results from Direct Reports: Initiative

degrees of initiative

Through organizational coaching I help Chicago executives enhance their time management. Sometimes it’s by changing the way they interact with their team–helping them obtain better results from their direct reports.

One such method is empowerment via improving the degree to which direct reports are required to take initiative.

Consider the five levels of initiative as Oncken and Wass described in one of the most popular Harvard Business Review articles of all time:

1. Wait until told (lowest initiative);
2. Ask what to do;
3. Recommend, then take resulting action;
4. Act, but advise at once;
5. Act on own, then routinely report (highest initiative)

What would happen if your team eliminated the two lowest degrees, and operated mostly at the top two levels? How much more do you think you could accomplish? When do you think the results would begin to show in performance reviews?

Initially this shift might result in more time committed to people development, but longer term should produce happier staff and calmer bosses.

What tricks do you use to get people to act from a higher level of initiative?

Search Spark Productivity

Wondering how to improve productivity?

Spark Productivity delivers customized training solutions that help individuals and teams become more focused, joyful, and confident as they improve productivity.
Who is Sue Becker?

Sue Becker Spark Productivity trainer, Sue Becker, works with people and organizations that want to do and achieve more — and feel more fulfilled in the process.
Free White Paper

Regain Inbox Control

Our advice on how to organize email. We sincerely hope it delivers the results you're seeking and that you regain inbox control.

Free White Paper

Manage Time With a Budget

Our advice on how to organize time with a budget. We trust it will help you to be more realistic about scheduling so you accomplish the important stuff.